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Aging Copier (Inkjet) Paper

© patriciao82173

Supplies

Paper (the author used Georgia Pacific's Paper Made Simple Bright White 96bright/160white/20lb available at Walmart)
Tea bag, any variety (the author used Orange Pekoe & Pekoe Cut Black Tea, National Cup brand)
Warm/hot water
Photography tray or baking pan large enough to hold paper and water
Baking sheet
2 towels
Iron
Oven

Optional Supplies
Brown/black stamp pads
Paint brush
Matches/lighter

Instructions

Rip open the tea bags and pour into the pan. Pour warm to hot tap water into the pan.

Place one sheet of paper in the water and submerge most or all of it. Wait long enough for the paper to soak thoroughly and start to turn brown.

Place paper on baking sheet (the author puts it additionally on top of a piece of cooking parchment) and put in warm oven (doesn't have to be on can be after you have just cooked and oven is still warm). Leave for a minute or two to dry.

Place the dry paper between two towels. Iron until flat enough to be used in printer (more than one page can be ironed at once).

Place in printer and print items as required.

For additonal aging, use the edge of a black or brown stamp pad or a brush dabbed onto the stamp pad to age corners or edges of the paper. You can also tear edges and use stamp pad on the tears or even burn the edges carefully with a match or lighter (adult supervision recommended).

Credit

Patriciao82173's tutorial was taken with permission.

Please note that the patterns and tutorials you find here have been designed by Harry Potter fans all over the Internet. The authors alone hold the copyrights and licences to these patterns and tutorials, which means you CANNOT use their patterns to make something that you will sell to others afterwards. You can use them to make things for yourself. You can make some for your friends and ask them to pay for supplies. You CANNOT, however, ask them to pay you to do it as though you had created this pattern by yourself, or try to sell you crafts to a local store.

Think about it. Would you take a Prisoner of Azkaban book, photocopy it, put your name in big red letters on the front cover and try to sell it in your local library? The answer is, obviously, no. Well, selling crafts you have made but not designed would be just as bad!

Also note that the tutorials, recipes and patterns found here have not been tested and that The Leaky Cauldron's Harry Potter Crafts section is not responsible for any mistakes they may contain. If you do find something wrong in one of them, however, please e-mail us to let us know.

On that note, Harry crafting to all!